Home & Garden

Raised Stencil Tutorial

I love the look of a French Chateau! And unfortunately, there aren't any in Big Rapids, Michigan, so I have done my best to get the feel over the years. When I spotted this technique for raised stencils several years ago, I fell in love! I did my research on how it was done and let it simmer for a while.

I wanted our entry to flow better with the rest of our house. Your entry sets the feel for the rest of your house and it's the first thing your guests see. Sometimes, it's the only thing people see. I wanted ours to make a statement.

So I started out painting the our white closet doors and trim with the same wood-tone technique that I had done in the rest of the house. You can see the closet reflected in the mirror, the shutter on the window and the trim on the door. Then I went to the walls.

I painted them a uniform Sand by Sherwin Williams - from top trim to bottom, including the chair rail. I experimented with the chair rail being a wood tone and didn't like it so went back and covered my experiment.

And then I paused and almost cried. I truly had loved the old paint technique in the room and now it was just a flat, boring beige. I texted my daughter and told her I may have made a mistake. And then I reminded myself how furniture can sometimes look when you're in the middle of the job and told myself that it will be okay!

The next day I gathered the supplies I had bought for this design and took a deep breath. I marked the places I wanted the stencils to be, basically the same places they had been on the previous design.

I used painter's tape to hold the stencil to the wall and applied the plaster over the stencil with a small trowel. I got the plaster into all the holes and then skimmed back over it, leaving a thinner, even coat. Then immediately pulled the stencil off the wall.

I believe I bought this stencil from Royal Design Studio several years ago but couldn't find it to link to it. Cutting Edge stencils also has some beautiful damask patterns.
As you can see, there's just a thin layer of plaster. In some areas, because I had to bend my stencil around corners or be up against trim, I got some thicker lumps. I removed some when the plaster was wet and went back when it was almost dry and sanded some down. It was really easy to work with. And the imperfections add to the charm.

I let the stencils dry for a full 24 hours. The next day they were hard and solid. My family panicked a little saying, "You know this is permanent!"  (I've been known to re-decorate.) ;)

I then used this roller and put Sand by SW in one side and Antique White by Valspar  in the other side and went back over my walls, including the raised stencil to get an uneven look on my walls.

I wasn't blogging at the time so I don't have any more pictures of the process. I then used these products to accent the stencils.

It was really an experiment. Some things that I thought I would like were too dark. Whenever I didn't like something, I covered it back up with Sand. There are about 20 of these raised stencils in the room and each one is uniquely painted. What I mostly ended up with was very little of the bronze glaze and more of the pearl glaze. The stencils become more evident depending on where you're standing in the room and how the light is hitting them.

If I ever get tired of them, a coat of paint the same color as the room would cause them to barely show.

Here are some pictures I found on Pinterest that were my inspiration:






This last picture is a door! And I know exactly the door in my house that I can do this on!

And here's mine. I darkened the color so that you can see the pattern a little better. Our walls are much lighter. And none of my inspiration pictures used a glaze with a sheen to it but like I said, I experimented and that's what I ended up liking.

I think a lot of my inspiration pictures were done on plaster walls (of a French chateau) and that was more work than I could do. So mine is a modern compromise.

I hope this explained the process well. It took me about 5 days to finish this all. One for trim and closets, one for wall base coat, one for plaster stencils, and a couple more days painting all the stencils and finding the look I liked. This is a large room (25x15) and the fun thing is, depending on your stencil pattern, placement and paint, there are so many options to try!

My husband loves it. He got a far away look in his eye in the middle of this whole thing and I asked him what he was thinking. He replied, "I'm worried about all the rooms you could do this in!" 

Poor man! Right now, I'm thinking about that closet door!

love and blessings~


“Everyone then who hears these words of mine and does them will be like a wise man who built his house on the rock.  And the rain fell, and the floods came, and the winds blew and beat on that house, but it did not fall, because it had been founded on the rock. And everyone who hears these words of mine and does not do them will be like a foolish man who built his house on the sand.  And the rain fell, and the floods came, and the winds blew and beat against that house, and it fell, and great was the fall of it.” Matthew 7:24-27

Supplies:
Sponge paint roller
Sand by Sherwin Williams
Antique White by Valspar
painter's tape
stencil
wall plaster
Valspar Copper Glaze
Rustoleum Pearl Glaze


Standard
Home & Garden, Tips & How To

How To Make Faux Beams

I love rustic beams. I have been bugging suggesting to my husband that we put beams in our living room and family room for years. When I finally painted the existing beam in our living room, that was covered in drywall, to look like wood, he agreed that we could add some more details.

I wanted our beams to do this...

I didn't know what to call it so I showed a picture to my husband.

He never said a word. He just disappeared into the garage and I thought he was cleaning up from what we had just finished. When I went out to check on him, I found him making these!


He mitered the sides so that they fit together perfectly and so that they looked like solid beams.
He reinforced them.
And put the lid on them!
He then delivered them to me to be painted. I wanted to paint them so that they would match the faux wood treatment I'd already done in here.


We had already gotten boards that matched the width of the beam on the ceiling. He attached them to the wall...
using big bolts that we pre-painted black.
We did the same thing on the opposite wall - added a board down the wall and attached our faux beam. The black bolts tie in with the black gate hinges on the shutters.
Now I'm bugging  suggesting to him that we need another one on the other side of the room!
We've also recently added some wood trim to hallways and I hope to add some to the wall with the mirror. And I've almost gotten all of our doors painted and will show them to you soon!

You can see more pictures of this room on yesterday's post.

love and blessings~
"Behold, I will set your stones in turquoise, and your foundations I will lay in sapphires. I will make your summits of rubies and your gates of crystal, and your entire wall of precious stones."
Isaiah 54:11,12


I''m joining these linky parties:
Standard
Home & Garden, Tips & How To

How To Make Faux Beams

I love rustic beams. I have been bugging suggesting to my husband that we put beams in our living room and family room for years. When I finally painted the existing beam in our living room, that was covered in drywall, to look like wood, he agreed that we could add some more details.

I wanted our beams to do this...

I didn't know what to call it so I showed a picture to my husband.

He never said a word. He just disappeared into the garage and I thought he was cleaning up from what we had just finished. When I went out to check on him, I found him making these!


He mitered the sides so that they fit together perfectly and so that they looked like solid beams.
He reinforced them.
And put the lid on them!
He then delivered them to me to be painted. I wanted to paint them so that they would match the faux wood treatment I'd already done in here.


We had already gotten boards that matched the width of the beam on the ceiling. He attached them to the wall...
using big bolts that we pre-painted black.
We did the same thing on the opposite wall - added a board down the wall and attached our faux beam. The black bolts tie in with the black gate hinges on the shutters.
Now I'm bugging  suggesting to him that we need another one on the other side of the room!
We've also recently added some wood trim to hallways and I hope to add some to the wall with the mirror. And I've almost gotten all of our doors painted and will show them to you soon!

You can see more pictures of this room on yesterday's post.

love and blessings~
"Behold, I will set your stones in turquoise, and your foundations I will lay in sapphires. I will make your summits of rubies and your gates of crystal, and your entire wall of precious stones."
Isaiah 54:11,12


I''m joining these linky parties:
Standard
Home & Garden, Tips & How To

Our New Chaise Makeover

I bought this French chaise from a photography studio here in town. It had never been in a home and was used only for photographs so it was in perfect condition. I have always wanted one of these and was thrilled when I saw it for sale. 


When you last saw it, it looked like this. And even though it was perfect, I didn't want to leave it pink.

So, I painted the upholstery and the wood frame with chalk paint and covered the cushions with drop cloths. I used the same methods I used on these chairs. (The secret is to sand the fabric after you paint it!) I liked the way they turned out and nobody has ever suspected that the fabric was painted. I used the same colors on this chaise.

And I covered the cushions with drop cloths using the same steps I used for slip covering my couch.
How to Make a Slip Cover - Part Two

This makeover was free - I already had the paint and the drop cloth but you could buy enough paint and a drop cloth for less than $20.

This chaise is super comfy! My son was here for a visit and when he spotted this, he immediately flopped down on it and looked out the window.  And that's what I do, too!
We're almost done with our bedroom makeover. You can see the edge of the track for the barn door in this picture. My husband has worked and worked to get it up. The end screws don't hit a stud and he's had to change the molly bolts several times to try to get it securely on the wall.

He made another trip to the store this weekend for more bolts and hopefully he'll get it figured out this week. In the meantime, he's been working on putting rustic wood all around our house. I'm excited to show it to you when we get it done.


Find out how I made this pillow here: Making Pillows for the Master Bedroom and our progress on our master bedroom here.

Have a wonderful week!

love and blessings~

"Behold, I will set your stones in turquoise, and your foundations I will lay in sapphires. I will make your summits of rubies and your gates of crystal, and your entire wall of precious stones."
Isaiah 54:11,12

I'm joining these linky parties:
thoughts-of-home-on-thursday
diy-collective-no-12
Rattlebridge Farm



Standard
Home & Garden, Tips & How To

Our New Chaise Makeover

I bought this French chaise from a photography studio here in town. It had never been in a home and was used only for photographs so it was in perfect condition. I have always wanted one of these and was thrilled when I saw it for sale. 


When you last saw it, it looked like this. And even though it was perfect, I didn't want to leave it pink.

So, I painted the upholstery and the wood frame with chalk paint and covered the cushions with drop cloths. I used the same methods I used on these chairs. (The secret is to sand the fabric after you paint it!) I liked the way they turned out and nobody has ever suspected that the fabric was painted. I used the same colors on this chaise.

And I covered the cushions with drop cloths using the same steps I used for slip covering my couch.
How to Make a Slip Cover - Part Two

This makeover was free - I already had the paint and the drop cloth but you could buy enough paint and a drop cloth for less than $20.

This chaise is super comfy! My son was here for a visit and when he spotted this, he immediately flopped down on it and looked out the window.  And that's what I do, too!
We're almost done with our bedroom makeover. You can see the edge of the track for the barn door in this picture. My husband has worked and worked to get it up. The end screws don't hit a stud and he's had to change the molly bolts several times to try to get it securely on the wall.

He made another trip to the store this weekend for more bolts and hopefully he'll get it figured out this week. In the meantime, he's been working on putting rustic wood all around our house. I'm excited to show it to you when we get it done.


Find out how I made this pillow here: Making Pillows for the Master Bedroom and our progress on our master bedroom here.

Have a wonderful week!

love and blessings~

"Behold, I will set your stones in turquoise, and your foundations I will lay in sapphires. I will make your summits of rubies and your gates of crystal, and your entire wall of precious stones."
Isaiah 54:11,12

I'm joining these linky parties:
thoughts-of-home-on-thursday
diy-collective-no-12
Rattlebridge Farm



Standard
Home & Garden, Tips & How To

Making Pillows for the Master Bedroom

We had beautiful weather here over Spring Break. We didn't go anywhere because my husband had recently returned from an Economics Conference and has another one coming up soon.  So we spent the week with our family and working on a few small projects around the house.

We almost have our barn door up.  We ran into a few snags but are working them out and should have it up this week. I can't wait!

So, in the meantime, I've worked on some other small things. I don't usually buy throw pillows very often. Every once in a while I'll find something I really like and buy it but usually I'd rather make mine out of whatever fabric I'm using in my room.

I ordered this gold damask fabric along with the tassel fringe when I ordered the blue damask. I canceled the blue when the company notified me that they required a minimum order of five yards. I couldn't use all five yards and I didn't want to spend that much money. I had ordered this gold fabric, thinking I would use it too, but when it came I decided to make all my pillows from it.

The blue in this fabric is very subtle but the tassel fringe had all three of the colors of the fabric and was perfect to tie everything together.
The links are at the end of the post for the fabrics and fringe.

I first made two big shams out of the damask. I measured my fabric up against a king-sized pillow and cut it out with enough to fold over.
I sewed this all around. I then cut out two pieces for the back of the sham.  I didn't want to use up my damask so I used a tan fabric that I already had.  Plus, this damask is so heavy that putting two layers together would be too much.  If you're interested in purchasing this fabric, it was great for these pillows but it's the heaviest fabric I've ever used. My sewing machine would not go through these corners and edges of this back fabric. I would not try to use it for a slip cover. It's upholstery weight. It doesn't fold...it bends.  lol
I made an envelope opening on the back of this sham and then inserted my pillow.  I didn't worry about centering my pattern on the pillow because I knew I was going to tuck it behind the bedspread shams. Otherwise, you want to center your pattern on your pillow.
I also made two large square pillows with my blue fabric on the back and the gold damask on the front.

I backed both of these pillows with the bluestone polyester.  This gives me the option of flipping them over and having more blue on the bed. After I put them together, I stuffed them all with polyfil and hand-stitched the openings closed.

This little one I made with what fabric I had left after all the others. I would have liked it to be a little larger but this is all the gold damask fabric I had left.  If you're wanting to make these same pillows and want this one to be bigger, you'll need to order more than 2 yards.

I made one small square pillow with blue on both sides.

The large shams are tucked behind the shams that came with the spread.  The gold pillow in the middle was one I already had (ready-made). It has small fleur-de-lis in the fabric.

I got my French chaise painted and reupholstered today. It needs a pillow. I probably am going to have to make some more! lol

If you're on Spring Break this week, I hope you have a wonderful time!

love and blessings~
"Behold, I will set your stones in turquoise, and your foundations I will lay in sapphires. I will make your summits of rubies and your gates of crystal, and your entire wall of precious stones."
Isaiah 54:11,12


Pentex Antique Gold Damask Fabric - 2 yards
Bluestone Polyester - 1 yard
Blue Tassel Fringe - 7 yards

I'm joining these linky parties:
stonegableblog





Standard
Home & Garden, Tips & How To

Making Pillows for the Master Bedroom

We had beautiful weather here over Spring Break. We didn't go anywhere because my husband had recently returned from an Economics Conference and has another one coming up soon.  So we spent the week with our family and working on a few small projects around the house.

We almost have our barn door up.  We ran into a few snags but are working them out and should have it up this week. I can't wait!

So, in the meantime, I've worked on some other small things. I don't usually buy throw pillows very often. Every once in a while I'll find something I really like and buy it but usually I'd rather make mine out of whatever fabric I'm using in my room.

I ordered this gold damask fabric along with the tassel fringe when I ordered the blue damask. I canceled the blue when the company notified me that they required a minimum order of five yards. I couldn't use all five yards and I didn't want to spend that much money. I had ordered this gold fabric, thinking I would use it too, but when it came I decided to make all my pillows from it.

The blue in this fabric is very subtle but the tassel fringe had all three of the colors of the fabric and was perfect to tie everything together.
The links are at the end of the post for the fabrics and fringe.

I first made two big shams out of the damask. I measured my fabric up against a king-sized pillow and cut it out with enough to fold over.
I sewed this all around. I then cut out two pieces for the back of the sham.  I didn't want to use up my damask so I used a tan fabric that I already had.  Plus, this damask is so heavy that putting two layers together would be too much.  If you're interested in purchasing this fabric, it was great for these pillows but it's the heaviest fabric I've ever used. My sewing machine would not go through these corners and edges of this back fabric. I would not try to use it for a slip cover. It's upholstery weight. It doesn't fold...it bends.  lol
I made an envelope opening on the back of this sham and then inserted my pillow.  I didn't worry about centering my pattern on the pillow because I knew I was going to tuck it behind the bedspread shams. Otherwise, you want to center your pattern on your pillow.
I also made two large square pillows with my blue fabric on the back and the gold damask on the front.

I backed both of these pillows with the bluestone polyester.  This gives me the option of flipping them over and having more blue on the bed. After I put them together, I stuffed them all with polyfil and hand-stitched the openings closed.

This little one I made with what fabric I had left after all the others. I would have liked it to be a little larger but this is all the gold damask fabric I had left.  If you're wanting to make these same pillows and want this one to be bigger, you'll need to order more than 2 yards.

I made one small square pillow with blue on both sides.

The large shams are tucked behind the shams that came with the spread.  The gold pillow in the middle was one I already had (ready-made). It has small fleur-de-lis in the fabric.

I got my French chaise painted and reupholstered today. It needs a pillow. I probably am going to have to make some more! lol

If you're on Spring Break this week, I hope you have a wonderful time!

love and blessings~
"Behold, I will set your stones in turquoise, and your foundations I will lay in sapphires. I will make your summits of rubies and your gates of crystal, and your entire wall of precious stones."
Isaiah 54:11,12


Pentex Antique Gold Damask Fabric - 2 yards
Bluestone Polyester - 1 yard
Blue Tassel Fringe - 7 yards

I'm joining these linky parties:
stonegableblog





Standard
Home & Garden, Tips & How To

Painting a French Dresser



Yesterday I shared all the changes in our entry, including this French dresser that I refinished.  I found this dresser on Craig's List and purchased it for $100.  

Below is what it looked like when I bought it. It's a very heavy piece and in good solid shape but had some surface scuffs and flaws.
I removed the drawers and took off all the hardware.
  I wanted to emphasize the details on all the drawers.
Using an old plastic tray that had had fruit salad in it, I put blue (the blue I mixed and used on another cabinet) in one section, off white in the small section and the same blue lightened with off white in the third section. I mixed chalk-paint additive into all three colors. I didn't do any pre-sanding as I've found that chalk paint always adheres wonderfully.

I used the lighter blue and painted all around the edges first.
While it was still wet, I painted the center of the drawer fronts the dark blue. It's a subtle difference but does a lot to keep your piece from looking flat and cheap.
When I painted the body of the dresser, I used all three shades of paint to give a very uneven finish.  I added extra of the off-white to the details.
I waited several hours until my paint had dried well and then using a sponge sander, distressed the dresser.  I focused on edges and corners that would naturally get the most wear and tear.

I had to put the hardware back on before I put the drawers back in.  I wanted to make sure my drawers matched the body and knew they'd get stuck and I couldn't get them open without the hardware - because that had already happened earlier!  lol

The next morning I went over the whole dresser with wax made for chalk paint that I purchased at Lowe's.  When it had dried well, I applied Rub n' Buff.  I have this 12 piece sample set.  I haven't had it long.  When I first got it, I experimented with it until I knew what to expect.  It's a great product and so much fun when you're refinishing furniture! (not a sponsored post).

I used the Antique Gold and went over all the curvy edges on the drawers and on the top and bottom of the cabinet.  You can also see the off-white streaks that I blended out on the top. The black streaks you're seeing is Rub n' Buff Ebony.

In this picture you can see the distressing, the Antique Gold and the Ebony Rub 'n Buff I used.  I also used some of the Pewter and Patina (a light turquoise) in places.  They showed a little too much. Any place that I didn't like the effect I just lightly painted over and I liked the subtle difference it made. I wanted it to look like it was originally painted blue with gilt and had gotten worn and faded over the years.  I didn't use any antiquing wax.

The hardware already had an antiqued gold finish and I didn't do anything to it.

When I first put the dresser in the room my daughter wasn't sure she liked it.  She walked in again the day after I had painted it and loved it!  Painting it made all the difference!

I'm always surprised how quickly chalk paint dries.  I waxed the top heavily as everyone who comes into our home drops whatever they have here (on my previous table.)  But the nice thing is the finish is very imperfect and any changes from guests would probably not be noticeable!

If I've left anything out, please feel free to ask questions.  I'm not an expert by any means but will be happy to tell you what I did.

Have a wonderful weekend!

love and blessings~

"For I am not ashamed of the gospel, because it is the power of God that brings salvation to everyone who believes: first to the Jew, then to the Gentile. For in the gospel the righteousness of God is revealed—a righteousness that is by faith from first to last, just as it is written: “The righteous will live by faith.” Romans 1:16-17

I'm joining these great parties:
oursouthernhomesc
dwellings-theheartofyourhome
thoughtsfromalice
lifeonlakeshoredrive
coastalcharm
astrollthrulife
stonegableblog
thriftydecorchick
diybydesign.




savvysouthernstyle
Standard
Home & Garden, Tips & How To

Painting a French Dresser



Yesterday I shared all the changes in our entry, including this French dresser that I refinished.  I found this dresser on Craig's List and purchased it for $100.  

Below is what it looked like when I bought it. It's a very heavy piece and in good solid shape but had some surface scuffs and flaws.
I removed the drawers and took off all the hardware.
  I wanted to emphasize the details on all the drawers.
Using an old plastic tray that had had fruit salad in it, I put blue (the blue I mixed and used on another cabinet) in one section, off white in the small section and the same blue lightened with off white in the third section. I mixed chalk-paint additive into all three colors. I didn't do any pre-sanding as I've found that chalk paint always adheres wonderfully.

I used the lighter blue and painted all around the edges first.
While it was still wet, I painted the center of the drawer fronts the dark blue. It's a subtle difference but does a lot to keep your piece from looking flat and cheap.
When I painted the body of the dresser, I used all three shades of paint to give a very uneven finish.  I added extra of the off-white to the details.
I waited several hours until my paint had dried well and then using a sponge sander, distressed the dresser.  I focused on edges and corners that would naturally get the most wear and tear.

I had to put the hardware back on before I put the drawers back in.  I wanted to make sure my drawers matched the body and knew they'd get stuck and I couldn't get them open without the hardware - because that had already happened earlier!  lol

The next morning I went over the whole dresser with wax made for chalk paint that I purchased at Lowe's.  When it had dried well, I applied Rub n' Buff.  I have this 12 piece sample set.  I haven't had it long.  When I first got it, I experimented with it until I knew what to expect.  It's a great product and so much fun when you're refinishing furniture! (not a sponsored post).

I used the Antique Gold and went over all the curvy edges on the drawers and on the top and bottom of the cabinet.  You can also see the off-white streaks that I blended out on the top. The black streaks you're seeing is Rub n' Buff Ebony.

In this picture you can see the distressing, the Antique Gold and the Ebony Rub 'n Buff I used.  I also used some of the Pewter and Patina (a light turquoise) in places.  They showed a little too much. Any place that I didn't like the effect I just lightly painted over and I liked the subtle difference it made. I wanted it to look like it was originally painted blue with gilt and had gotten worn and faded over the years.  I didn't use any antiquing wax.

The hardware already had an antiqued gold finish and I didn't do anything to it.

When I first put the dresser in the room my daughter wasn't sure she liked it.  She walked in again the day after I had painted it and loved it!  Painting it made all the difference!

I'm always surprised how quickly chalk paint dries.  I waxed the top heavily as everyone who comes into our home drops whatever they have here (on my previous table.)  But the nice thing is the finish is very imperfect and any changes from guests would probably not be noticeable!

If I've left anything out, please feel free to ask questions.  I'm not an expert by any means but will be happy to tell you what I did.

Have a wonderful weekend!

love and blessings~

"For I am not ashamed of the gospel, because it is the power of God that brings salvation to everyone who believes: first to the Jew, then to the Gentile. For in the gospel the righteousness of God is revealed—a righteousness that is by faith from first to last, just as it is written: “The righteous will live by faith.” Romans 1:16-17

I'm joining these great parties:
oursouthernhomesc
dwellings-theheartofyourhome
thoughtsfromalice
lifeonlakeshoredrive
coastalcharm
astrollthrulife
stonegableblog
thriftydecorchick
diybydesign.




savvysouthernstyle
Standard
Home & Garden, Tips & How To

Reupholstering a Round Ottoman – With Almost No Sewing!

Yesterday I posted all the changes I had made in our living room.  The kick-off was finding a beautiful blue plaid faux silk and deciding to reupholster our round ottoman.

I bought this ottoman several years ago at a second hand store. Recently I had it slip covered with a simple cover that I made from drop cloth fabric.  But I knew that was temporary.

I did this project without much sewing at all!   You could do this by sewing only 3 short seams and using fabric glue or iron on adhesive for your hem.


I only had to order two yards of this fabric as it was 110" wide!  That's twice the normal width so half the normal fabric order.  I got this fabric at warehousefabricinc.com for only $19.99 a yard.  (not a sponsored post)  You will probably need about 4 yards of 54" fabric.  This will give you some left over fabric to make a couple of matching pillows, which I always like to have.

You will need:
4 yards of 54" fabric
ball fringe
matching thread
a measuring tape
scissors
straight pins
fabric glue
iron on adhesive (if you don't want to sew your hem)
staple gun and staples

I first cut a piece to cover the top of the ottoman.
I then stapled my fabric onto my ottoman.  Using a staple gun, I first stapled opposite sides, then opposite sides again, so that I had staple the four corners of the ottoman.  I then gently worked the gathers into the fabric and stapled all around as I went.  Then I trimmed off the excess fabric.

I measured from the staple line to the floor to get my length for the skirt, about 11" and then added enough for hem.  I then measured the circumference of the ottoman and cut 3 lengths of fabric 13" wide, about two and a half the length of the circumference of the ottoman.   I sewed the ends together so I that I had a continuous length, that made a circle and was 13" wide.

I put a hem in one side so that my skirt would have a finished hem.  You can use iron on adhesive for this step.  I do that often when I'm making slip covers or doing reupholstery because your seam is invisible.  Because I had such a busy pattern, I hid my seam easily.

I stapled the fabric to the ottoman in one spot.

Then I went to the opposite side of the ottoman.  pulled the skirt fabric until I found the exact middle and stapled that middle spot to the exact opposite on the ottoman of the first staple.  I now had my fabric evenly spaced around the ottoman.

I went to the 1/4 spot and found the middle and stapled.  I went to the opposite side, found the middle and stapled.

I repeated that process until it looked like this.
I then took a section of fabric and folded it like this and stapled it down.
I repeated this process all around the ottoman.  Because each section was the same size, it was easy to make my pleats even.
I went all around the ottoman again, stapling continually, making sure everything was attached securely.

I used the staple gun to attach my fringe.  When I turned the gun so that staples went on vertically they disappeared into the pattern of the fringe.  You may want to use fabric glue for this step if your staples are showing.  I used fabric glue at the end of my fringe, turning it under so it won't fray, and stapling it down.


It only took me about 3 hours to finish the whole job.  My daughter, who doesn't sew, read my tutorial and said, "I think even I could do that!"

I've always liked this ottoman when it's upholstered because I think it looks like a giant pin cushion! lol

Have a great day!

love and blessings~


"But a natural man does not accept the things of the Spirit of God, for they are foolishness to him; and he cannot understand them, because they are spiritually appraised. " 1 Corinthians 2:14

I'm joining these linky parties:


Standard
Home & Garden, Tips & How To

Reupholstering a Round Ottoman – With Almost No Sewing!

Yesterday I posted all the changes I had made in our living room.  The kick-off was finding a beautiful blue plaid faux silk and deciding to reupholster our round ottoman.

I bought this ottoman several years ago at a second hand store. Recently I had it slip covered with a simple cover that I made from drop cloth fabric.  But I knew that was temporary.

I did this project without much sewing at all!   You could do this by sewing only 3 short seams and using fabric glue or iron on adhesive for your hem.


I only had to order two yards of this fabric as it was 110" wide!  That's twice the normal width so half the normal fabric order.  I got this fabric at warehousefabricinc.com for only $19.99 a yard.  (not a sponsored post)  You will probably need about 4 yards of 54" fabric.  This will give you some left over fabric to make a couple of matching pillows, which I always like to have.

You will need:
4 yards of 54" fabric
ball fringe
matching thread
a measuring tape
scissors
straight pins
fabric glue
iron on adhesive (if you don't want to sew your hem)
staple gun and staples

I first cut a piece to cover the top of the ottoman.
I then stapled my fabric onto my ottoman.  Using a staple gun, I first stapled opposite sides, then opposite sides again, so that I had staple the four corners of the ottoman.  I then gently worked the gathers into the fabric and stapled all around as I went.  Then I trimmed off the excess fabric.

I measured from the staple line to the floor to get my length for the skirt, about 11" and then added enough for hem.  I then measured the circumference of the ottoman and cut 3 lengths of fabric 13" wide, about two and a half the length of the circumference of the ottoman.   I sewed the ends together so I that I had a continuous length, that made a circle and was 13" wide.

I put a hem in one side so that my skirt would have a finished hem.  You can use iron on adhesive for this step.  I do that often when I'm making slip covers or doing reupholstery because your seam is invisible.  Because I had such a busy pattern, I hid my seam easily.

I stapled the fabric to the ottoman in one spot.

Then I went to the opposite side of the ottoman.  pulled the skirt fabric until I found the exact middle and stapled that middle spot to the exact opposite on the ottoman of the first staple.  I now had my fabric evenly spaced around the ottoman.

I went to the 1/4 spot and found the middle and stapled.  I went to the opposite side, found the middle and stapled.

I repeated that process until it looked like this.
I then took a section of fabric and folded it like this and stapled it down.
I repeated this process all around the ottoman.  Because each section was the same size, it was easy to make my pleats even.
I went all around the ottoman again, stapling continually, making sure everything was attached securely.

I used the staple gun to attach my fringe.  When I turned the gun so that staples went on vertically they disappeared into the pattern of the fringe.  You may want to use fabric glue for this step if your staples are showing.  I used fabric glue at the end of my fringe, turning it under so it won't fray, and stapling it down.


It only took me about 3 hours to finish the whole job.  My daughter, who doesn't sew, read my tutorial and said, "I think even I could do that!"

I've always liked this ottoman when it's upholstered because I think it looks like a giant pin cushion! lol

Have a great day!

love and blessings~


"But a natural man does not accept the things of the Spirit of God, for they are foolishness to him; and he cannot understand them, because they are spiritually appraised. " 1 Corinthians 2:14

I'm joining these linky parties:


Standard
Home & Garden, Tips & How To

How to Make a Welcome Sign

There's something about early Fall that makes me want to decorate my front entry.  Maybe it's because all the summer flowers are fading.  But maybe it's because there are so many beautiful things you can do this time of year to give your guests a warm welcome!

I made this simple 'Welcome Sign' in no time at all.



We had some fence slats in our garage that we hadn't used and I grabbed one.  It's outdoor treated wood so it's perfect for an outdoor sign!  You can pick one up any home improvement store for about a dollar.
I spray painted it whatever tan color I had available.  I actually used what was left in two different tan cans.

I bought some letters at Walmart that were the perfect size and spray painted them with an antique white.

Then I attached the letters with wood glue.


The next day as I was driving away from my house I noticed that my letters looked too bright so the next morning I gave the letters a once-over with a beige chalk paint.  My daughter noticed the difference right away and laughed that the first paint job lasted one day!

You can tell that it's just being held in place by the urn.  I originally had planned on putting it on the other side of the door but decided it was better here.  I was surprised by how well it matched the house!

I'm looking forward to adding pumpkins and other fall decor in a couple of weeks!

love and blessings~


"No weapon that is formed against you will prosper; And every tongue that accuses you in judgment you will condemn. This is the heritage of the servants of the LordAnd their vindication is from Me," declares the Lord." Isaiah 54:17
Joining these linky parties:savvysouthernstyleposedperfection




Standard
Home & Garden, Tips & How To

How to Make a Welcome Sign

There's something about early Fall that makes me want to decorate my front entry.  Maybe it's because all the summer flowers are fading.  But maybe it's because there are so many beautiful things you can do this time of year to give your guests a warm welcome!

I made this simple 'Welcome Sign' in no time at all.



We had some fence slats in our garage that we hadn't used and I grabbed one.  It's outdoor treated wood so it's perfect for an outdoor sign!  You can pick one up any home improvement store for about a dollar.
I spray painted it whatever tan color I had available.  I actually used what was left in two different tan cans.

I bought some letters at Walmart that were the perfect size and spray painted them with an antique white.

Then I attached the letters with wood glue.


The next day as I was driving away from my house I noticed that my letters looked too bright so the next morning I gave the letters a once-over with a beige chalk paint.  My daughter noticed the difference right away and laughed that the first paint job lasted one day!

You can tell that it's just being held in place by the urn.  I originally had planned on putting it on the other side of the door but decided it was better here.  I was surprised by how well it matched the house!

I'm looking forward to adding pumpkins and other fall decor in a couple of weeks!

love and blessings~


"No weapon that is formed against you will prosper; And every tongue that accuses you in judgment you will condemn. This is the heritage of the servants of the LordAnd their vindication is from Me," declares the Lord." Isaiah 54:17
Joining these linky parties:savvysouthernstyleposedperfection




Standard
Home & Garden, Tips & How To

Spray Painting a Brass Sink

When I told my daughter a couple of years ago that I was going to start blogging, she told me, "You should call your blog, 'There's a spray paint for that! hahahaha!'" She's a funny girl.

Obviously, I didn't follow her advice - but there's some truth in her statement.

There are a lot of things in our house that have been spray painted.  A couple of times. My spray paint collection is pretty impressive.  My husband will occasionally look at something in our house and ask me, "How many colors has THIS been?"  He's a funny guy.

But this is the first time I've ever spray painted a sink.

A couple of years ago we redecorated our main floor bathroom.  We spray painted all of our towel racks and hardware oiled bronze. They've held up perfectly.

We never use this sink. It looks really shiny in this picture.  I had scrubbed it for about 10 minutes. You might be able to tell that it's still not perfect. It stays shiny like this for about 3 hours.  Then it tarnishes.


This area in our dining room is obviously for mixing and serving drinks and we have never used it for that in the 12 years we've lived here.  I occasionally set a plant in it to water it well but otherwise...nothing. So I felt pretty confidant that it wasn't going to get a lot of wear and tear.  I certainly wouldn't advise doing this with a sink you use daily.

We tried to get this sink out.  Either to replace it or paint it...at the time we weren't sure which.  But we soon found out that it was in there for good.  So I went to Plan B.

We removed the faucet so that we could paint that separately. I taped off the sink and surrounded it with trash bags to protect the cabinet.

I then fixed a cardboard box to further protect the room while I painted.

I stuck the paint can into the box. sprayed all around and then 'closed the window' with a rag until the mist settled.

I did this several times until the sink was perfectly painted. I used Rustoleum for metal that included a primer.

We let it dry for several hours before we reattached the faucet.

Et voila!  New sink!  And I don't know if you can tell from this picture but it really is perfect.  And because of our experience with the bathroom, I think it will be durable enough.

I had a nice comment on my From Farmhouse to French Country-Part Two that the brass sink added some 'up' to the room and I agree.  It was a very pretty sink.  But it didn't match and it was hard to keep looking nice.  I think this was a nice solution.

Previously the sink was the only brass thing in the room.  Now it ties in perfectly with the cabinet hardware.

Have a great week!  I'll be back in a couple of days with my living room's newly painted French Blue shutters!
French Shutters
love and blessings~

Again Jesus spoke to them, saying, “I am the light of the world. Whoever follows me will not walk in darkness, but will have the light of life.”  John 8:12

I'm joining these parties: oursouthernhomescbetweennapsontheporch.karensuponthehillcoastalcharmastrollthrulifesavvysouthernstyletoo-much-timetatertotsandjellocedarhillfarmhouse.






Standard