Symphony

Encore of Revival: America, November 19, 2018

John Kelly's failure to book seats for the first lady on Airforce One, thereby creating security snafus and other logistic problems, was no mere oversight. A military man made White House chief of staff doesn't make security-logistic mistakes. Getting along with the first lady personally, then giving her a smaller staff than previous first ladies, refusing to promote her staff while promoting his own—all these were indications of something deeper.

Pacific Daily Times' Symphony suggested on September 10 that the "mole" who wrote the infamous, and since forgotten, "New York Times essay" fit the profile of someone like John Kelly. The clashes leading up to his rumored replacement fit the profile even more. Similarly, is a DHS chief performing poorly—another non-accident—, then Kelly clashing with security adviser John Bolton when Bolton criticized the poor performance. Try this hypothetical scenario: The essay author was in cahoots with other saboteurs; when a fellow saboteur was called-out, the saboteur naturally got defensive. Such a saboteur probably didn't storm out of the White House on October 18 from mere rage, but to perform apparently-needed damage control since his plans for sabotage were at risk. That scenario may not be true, but it would explain a lot. Does it seem all that strange that Kelly and the DHS chief he was so defensive of would both be on the radar for replacement?

Theories to fit the pieces together, however, are no more than theories. All we know from here is that a theory made Kelly's departure all too predictable and that, to know the rest, we'll just have to wait and see. Replacing a cabinet member should be easier with Governor Rick Scott having secured the fifty-second Republican seat in the Senate.

With rules of conduct in place for the White House press, it will be easier for reporters to have fair access to questions and easier for the White House to kick out reporters who want to take mic time from others. For suing the woman who worked at the White House who tried to take away the White House microphone from Jim Acosta—on camera—with no injury—when he wouldn't yield the floor to his peers—CNN and Acosta should be ashamed.

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Symphony

Encore of Revival: America, August 13, 2018

What happened to Omarosa is normal, it doesn't matter, and it's a darn shame that it's normal and doesn't matter. Bureaucratic America permeates every institution, from universities to small Christian congregations to telecommunications companies, even to the White House. They run people around, play dirty tricks, mistreat people of all skin tones, and now it's coming back to bite them in the hiney.

Omarosa herself is now under the microscope, which lets us see the shameful sham of why her story doesn't matter. It's just too normal. Bureaucracy doesn't attack everyone, but it sure does have its favorites. She seems to be one of them. Chuck Todd kept asking how and why she knew to record her meeting with White House Chief of Staff John Kelly. It's unbelievable for most people, except for bureaucracy's favorite people to bash. After a while bureaucracy victims get a nose for smelling the rigmarole around the corner. And, they have a knack for attracting trouble, if for no other reason than that bureaucracy doesn't like bloodhounds sniffing them down.

Here's how the archetypal scenario could likely play out—not how it actually did, but how it could have if bureaucracy behaves like bureaucracy...

Trump knows that worms in the White House are always trying to control him by controlling the information that gets to him. So, he asks Omarosa to get certain articles for him, going around his bureaucracy. Smelling trouble, she may have taken steps to protect herself, just as she did in recording the conversation, just as she did with giving her loves ones copies of the reported recording of Trump using the "N" word as a precaution just "in case she's rubbed out" (Esquire). That kind of preemptive-precautionary habit might have led her to violate some rules in the White House, though she would have been acting in defense, not hostility. John Kelly, like the classic bureaucrat he comes across as in the recording, wouldn't have been out of character to "trump" up, as it were, his firing case against Omarosa, though he wouldn't have been entirely unjustified either. She was likely a loose canon, which was why Trump wanted her there in the first place, and John Kelly arrived to tie down loose canons. Trump later told her that he "delegated" because he really did delegate. Trump wouldn't fire the lady himself since he adores her too much—this happens with many administrators because no one likes to fire friends. And, no one likes it when your good friend, the President, lets his chief fire you because you got too cautious on someone else's watch. Feelings are hurt, it wasn't meant to be personal, but it was personal. Now, hell hath no fury like a woman scorned.

...That's an archetypal speculation of how things may have gone down the hill.

Trump kept things chaotic on purpose so that an old boys' club couldn't keep him a prisoner of fame. This was the story on the street when Reince Priebus left. The Left praised John Kelly as the one possible man who might be able to control Trump. When he was first hired, Kelly was hailed by the Left as the savior. Now, when he does what the Left praised him for, it's all Trump's fault.

The words Kelly spoke were shamefully typical and ordinary in bureaucratic America, but they don't make him especially evil. Many, many pastors have been "fretired" through the same conversation in the back office. Coming from the White House raises the stakes, but other than that, the conversation seemed all too typical.

As for the "N" word, one statement doesn't define a person. It can be sad. But, everyone has said foolish things that they didn't mean, whether in stupidity or anger. No president will ever be an exception. In the minds of Trumpists, who only grow their numbers, discovering proof that a human is human is no longer a fireable offense.

Omarosa was a way for Trump to get around his own gatekeeper. If Trump doesn't hire Omarosa back, Kelly could end up "resigning" in the coming months.

The wisest action would be for Trump to have a one-on-one with Omarosa, apologize on a personal level for his own bureaucracy—which every institution in America has, shamefully—, hire her back so that only he has the power to fire her, also keep Kelly on to keep doing his job, and encourage her that she won't need to guard herself with more recordings and possible "ethics" violations anymore.

And, if he did use the "N" word, he should also say to the country, "Yeah, I did. I was an idiot, really sorry to everyone. Don't follow my bad example. Let's all be better and move one."

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