Symphony

Encore of Revival: America, May 30, 2016

Trump, Trump, Trump. It’s the new onomatopoeia for motorcycles and politics. But there is also other news, believe it or not. US flag sales are up, helping the Chinese manufacturing industry. It’s a start at patriotism, anyway. Soon enough, Americans will learn that being patriotic means keeping jobs in the country, which means not complaining about prices so much.

You read it here first, Trump going head-to-head against the Clinton’s will show an unseen game and tip the polls. There is a lot from the Clinton years that Trump will go after as no RINO has, making the anit-Clinton crowd not only stronger, but much, much larger. Prediction fulfilled this week.

Then, there’s bathrooms. Texas and a few others filed a lawsuit against the idea that gender identity choice was intended to be part of the Civil Rights law governing the bodies we are born with. They filed in a Conservative-friendly court. The DC circuit has been inclined to hear Conservative-Texan cases, which means that SCOTUS could hear the case—which means that SCOTUS could tie the case and bump it back to a lower Conservative ruling if a new Conservative justice isn’t appointed first.

In the unlikely event that the Congressional RINOs capitulate as their broken promises show, Trump would become the last Republican to be elected as a President before a third party replaces the GOP. Though typical, it would be unlikely this time because the scenario is all too obvious to the party. And it should be obvious to Obama.

He should have known that his transgender executive orders would be met with unbeatable opposition. So, what’s his end game? Is he merely trying to stir discussion—that’s all he’ll end up accomplishing, unless he knows something the public doesn’t. As Limbaugh has pointed out, simple one-person bathrooms would solve the entire problem—and refusing that option shows that solving the problem is not anyone’s goal. The public has yet to discuss any connection to the conspiracy theories surrounding Michelle Obama. Those conspiracy theories seem more plausible in lieu of Barack’s policies as Barack’s policies would have a clear motive if the conspiracy theories were true. While no one in the mainstream press has suggested the connection, the sharks and ravens are already circling, the sun is setting on the Obama policy season, and revival has already dawned.

continue reading

Standard
Faux Report

U.S. Government Says You Can Buy Alcohol, Cigarettes With Food Stamps Starting 2017

alcohol

WASHINGTON, D.C. – 

Faced with lingering debts due to a still struggling economy, President Barack Obama issued an executive order today allowing the purchase of alcohol and cigarettes with food stamps.

The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) offers nutrition assistance to eligible individuals who face financial or other hardships when trying to adequately feed themselves and their dependents.

The US Department of Agriculture, which oversees the program, has a strict policy on which items can and cannot be purchased with food stamps.  Alcohol and cigarettes are not categorized as “essential nutrition,” and were never allowed on the “Food Stamp Safety List” – until now.

“We’re faced with tough times. American families are still struggling, although the economy is slowly recovering,” said President Obama. “The boost in sales generated by alcohol and cigarette sales will help aid in the recovery efforts, and generate much-needed revenue.”

For years, the President has struggled with a much publicized nicotine addiction, and this executive decision is bound to raise the hackles of nutrition experts, not to mention closer to home, where the First Lady, Michelle Obama, has advocated healthy eating habits and exercise.  When asked if that may create tension within the White House, the President replied “I hope not.”

Other items disallowed on the food stamp list include vitamins, medicine, hot food or food eaten in a store, live animals, and cosmetics.

Major tobacco manufacturers and alcohol distributors have been slow to overly praise the decision, seen as controversial from both sides of the political aisle.  Members of the GOP have also remained strangely silent in their usual criticism of the President’s every action, owing to the fact that many members of Congress are on vacation and receive large subsidies from the alcohol and tobacco industries.

Standard
Symphony

Cadence of Conflict: Asia, February 22, 2016

China is deploying weapons. The US is responding with pressure—mostly economic, some political, always involving alliances. Money and trade are atop the list.

China’s unusual manipulation of its money is documented and under more scrutiny than ever.

According to Chinese State-run media, China has weapons on disputed islands by right. According to the government, US concern over militarizing those islands is “hype”. Still, Asean is watching the Pacific and so is Bloomberg.

continue reading

Standard
Symphony

Encore of Revival: America, February 15, 2016

Senior Supreme Justice Scalia died days after ruling against Obama. Cause of death is presumed and unchallenged, similarly to the legacy Obama wants. There will be no autopsy. There will be questions. One should pray for the health and safety of one’s adversaries in order to reduce questions. Obama wants to uphold the Constitution in appointing a nominee; will the nominee?

Sanders argues Constitutional compliance in the president appointing the next Supreme Justice. Does he know that he is a Democrat? If Sanders wanted to be fair and get rid of the 1% control, why did he choose a political party that gives extra delegate votes to the 1%? He won New Hampshire, but gained fewer delegates because of the system in the so-called “Democratic” party, having “superdelegates”. The Republican party treats all votes equally, and has given at least lip-service defense of the Constitution in a day when the Constitution seems to have many adversaries.

Perhaps someone should inform Homeland Security that Obama and Sanders have become sudden advocates of the Constitution. But, that would raise more questions.

You already read it here first: Sanders will lose to the Clinton machine. Sanders and his supporters asked for the superdelegate problem when they chose the so-called “Democratic” party. Smart people tend to win at things; not-smart people tend to not win. Frankly, serves them right. But, no one should be surprised that none of them figured out that this would happen ahead of time.

Liberals  can’t tell the difference between opinion and fact when their own opinions are involved. In this, they are unabashed as much as they are unaware. Conflation of opinion and fact, leveraging bully pulpits to impose bias, shamelessness—these are all indications that one has lost the argument and hasn’t yet figured out that one does know it.

While Pacific Daily Times will continue to interact with Quartz articles, because they have good quality writing, nonetheless bias and open about it, we now know with certainty that it is a Liberal blog. Breitbart, openly Right Wing establishment-ish, and The Blaze, more pure Conservative, are banned from the Times because of heavy website load times and for no other reason.

Perhaps Liberal blogs operate at a profit loss while Right Wing sites use establishment advertising methods that bog-down web resolve times. It’s a shame, what all periodicals involve. But, it indicates a shakeup and, among other things, that revival is returning to America.

You read it here first: Trump in New Hampshire, Trump is positioned to get some of the Sanders vote in the general.

Nation to State, the Federal Justice department is suing Ferguson, MO. This sets a precedent for the next White House to sue Chicago over corruption. North Korea is also cracking down on its leaders; one general was reported executed. Such are the ways of top-down politics. The high GOP turnout in New Hampshire is a bottom-up phenomenon. That’s the difference.

continue reading

Standard
Election

Opine: 2016 New Hampshire Debate

I normally don’t write about individual debates. Some things happened in New Hapmshire, however, which I thought were prophetic, other things telling.

When the candidates came out, Carson and Trump had difficulty hearing the media over the shouts of the crowd, even though the media kept calling them. Even Kasich had trouble. This strange leapfrog of candidates back and forth left Carson and Trump standing together while the other candidates passed by.

I thought many things in the scene seemed prophetic.

I have missed stage instructions myself. So, I understand exactly how this can happen, even with good planning.

continue reading

Standard
Symphony

Encore of Revival: America, February 1, 2016

Donald keeps making headlines. Just ahead of the Hawkeye Cauci, two polls report Trump and Cruz in a dead heat, the rest give Trump a 9-ish point lead. But only Iowans know how Iowans will caucus. Corn could a problem for Cruz. He may have gotten his message out too late. Or, perhaps too may Iowans like government subsidies for Cruz to ever win. Or, maybe ethanol doesn’t matter at all.

We’ll see. So will Microsoft. And so will Bernie see whether Microsoft sees clearly. This is the first time the election results are being calculated by the tech giant, inviting watchdogs. There are a lot of firsts in this election.

Trump’s absence at the Fox debate didn’t seem to matter to anyone but Fox—before the debate. And it didn’t seem to matter to anyone else before, not even Fox during or after. Debates themselves are being tested as to their worth, other than profitability. Thought-to-be campaign rules are being set on end so much, it is as if the Andrew Jackson campaign were making a comeback. Strategy books will write about these times, placing Trump alongside Drew, Abe, and Theo.

continue reading

Standard
Symphony

Cadence of Conflict: Asia, January 25, 2016

Since Taiwan’s election, China and the KMT-Nationalists have been largely silent. While the Chinese aren’t spending as much money at home, and while the Chinese economy looks evermore shaky, Xi Jinping has no problem dealing with Egypt or declaring all but war against Israel. Historically, talking ill of Israel is bad political luck. Perhaps China thinks itself the exception to many things.

Taiwan’s pro-China KMT-Nationalist party is out for the count. Defeated. Wind knocked-out. Humiliated. It’s over. And, it is surprising. Not only did the KMT respond by acknowledging their defeat; its members showed no awareness of how their pro-China policies would dissolve their power at home nor how their mismanagement of domestic disarray from poor policies would make their aspirations untenable. There was no way the could win, yet the only seem to have seen this in retrospect.

That hindsight realization could have a contagious affect and spread to US policy. The Obama administration has made a Trump nomination and victory ever bit as inevitable as how Taiwan’s DPP opposition victory owes thanks to Taiwan’s Ma administration. Tsai couldn’t not have won in 2016 just how Obama couldn’t have lost with George W. Bush’s foreign policies and refusal to respond to the press. Maybe the West will get wise. This year, there were no Chinese missiles fired across Taiwan, as there was in 1996. Few things indicate that Beijing is learning like this.

continue reading

Standard
Symphony

Encore of Revival: America, January 5, 2016

Obama’s speech was quite long-winded as he rebutted strong arguments he knows are coming against him. He also used the old Harvard debate tactic of claiming that his opponents agree with him, but of course not giving them the microphone. He is using executive order to make laws that Congress has already rejected. He is trying to make guns traceable through technology.

Individual ability to sell guns is in question and may not hold up in court. Imagine not being able to sell a car without a dealer license. There must be another way. Among those “better” ways includes enforcing laws already on the books, which he apparently hasn’t been doing. If Obama enforces his own executive orders as well as he enforces gun control laws already on the books, then there won’t be anything for gun advocates to worry about.

The bigger problem with restricting guns is China. No one is happier than Beijing. Not even the most radical Democrats and Liberals are as pleased with Obama’s gun laws as the Chinese Communists. Perhaps being in the direct line of sight for China’s attack has some bearing on why Oregonians have taken over a federal building.

continue reading

Standard
Symphony

December 23, 2015

Franklin Graham quits GOP (Fox)

Guns, guns, and more guns for Christmas (Today News-NBC)

Obama golfs (Weekly Standard)

China citizen score (Tech in Asia)

China’s anti0terrorism law inspired by US law (Yahoo-AFP)

Chinese media: Activists ‘disrupting social order’ (Yahoo-AFP)

Putin name-drops “Hope no n*kes” (Independent)

Inside: Censor or die: The death of Mexican news in the age of drug cartels (WP)  · · · →

continue reading
Standard
Symphony

Cadence of Conflict: Asia, December 14, 2015

As elections push forward in Taiwan and Malaysia, China faces it’s own political issue: Military reform.

The report from Reuters demonstrates two things. Firstly, we see that China’s military does, in fact, need reform. This is evidenced by the 300k military jobs cut since September. With an obviously larger shakeup coming, it is clear that the change is necessary, given China’s implied military status quo.

Secondly, we learn that China needs to sell the need for reform to its own military, thereby implying that, while the reform is necessary, many remain yet to be convinced that it is.

Generally speaking, growing assertiveness while implementing reform where there is no current invasion underway is typically an attempt to spread oneself too thin. This not only relates to the failing political establishment in Taiwan and Malaysia, but generic maritime strategy in the Pacific.

continue reading

Standard
Symphony

Encore of Revival: America, November 16, 2015

The fourth GOP debate dominated headlines through the week. Paris dominated everything, even over the DNC debate, through the weekend. Look at the numbers from Hollywood Reporter: 8.5 million DNC debate viewers, down from 15 million in the first debate. Not only does the GOP have more debates (indicating marketability of what Conservatives have to say), audiences seem less interested in the Democrats. Viewership itself should be a consideration in predicting elections. The Republican base is energized.

The US response to Paris had the usual boilerplate soapbox grandstanding, which is expected from pundits and politicians. The folks, however, seem disinterested in hearing what everyone already knows. Paris needs friends and prayers more than see-I-told-ya-so anecdotes. That being said, relearning from repeating history isn’t entirely foolish. But there is a time to mention the obvious and an obvious time to mourn.

While political and philosophical policies have left the West wide open to all sorts of attacks, both physical and ideological, the West is waking up.  · · · →

continue reading
Standard
Symphony

Cadence of Conflict: Asia, November 9, 2015

The two presidents of the two governments of China met in Singapore. The exiled government was protested on the island where it remains in exile. It was a wild week. Taiwan’s president, Ma, defended the importance of dialog while nearly every branch of his government clashed with protests.

The meeting comes at the brink of significant change. Taiwan is about to undergo a historic turnover of political powers. This may be the last chance the fading KMT-Nationalist establishment has for high-profile dialog with their Communist arch enemy in Beijing.

While China appears as strong as it is controversial, the US whispers about undisclosed technologies that the Communists will not want to encounter in the Pacific. Everyone has his story.

China

A Day After Summit, China Again Warns Taiwan Against Independence

US defense chief warns of conflict in S. China Sea

…”‘Surprising’ new technologies”

Goldman’s BRIC Era Ends as Fund Folds After Years of Losses

…”The excitement came from the rapid growth from China…”

Taiwan

Ma defends significance of meeting with Xi

Protesters, police injured in overnight demonstrations

…Sunflower students return, stormed military base, college official arrested, police clash at legislature and presidential palace

Meeting limits Taiwan’s cross-strait options: Tsai

Further reading…

Protesters rally to condemn meeting

 · · · → continue reading
Standard
Symphony

Encore of Revival: America, October 19, 2015

Registration, registration. Changes, changes. Dr. Ben Carson was registered in a small, sideline political party until almost one year ago. It will probably help him since most Republican voters vote Republican under protest. He could be the last viable RNC candidate, if the trend continues, and would be a more viable candidate on account of his former membership.

Homosexuals are announcing their status to the world, finding more and more creative ways to do it. Arguably, “coming out” on Facebook is more of a mating call than a warning to heterosexuals to keep away. “Coming out” is no longer as bold and courageous as it once was.

The courts won’t be able to be fair while differentiating the “Church of the Sword” foam sword fights from the tax-exempt Christian coffee-doughnut meetings on Sunday morning. The New Hampshire Church of the Sword will likely have copycats. The non-necessity of the Sunday morning method of Bible education and Christian friendship has been exposed.  · · · →

continue reading
Standard
Symphony

Cadence of Conflict: Asia, September 28, 2015

The unstated reason Chinese Pres. Xi snubbed Zuckerberg is probably for his age. Chinese think a man can’t do business until he’s at least in his 40’s and “is old enough to grow a mustache”. Whatever the reason, China having a Facebook page that Chinese can’t see, arriving in America with CEO’s fawning over him, it’s clear that China’s culture hasn’t changed and Xi is deeply entrenched in it. That should scare Americans because Chinese friendships can easily be used as fronts to get what they want, with unapologetic and total deception.

Zuckerberg’s Mandarin has terrible pronunciation. The crowd that applauds him is not giving a warm affirmation of quality and appreciation as an American audience would, but are “being polite”, giving the response they “should” when someone displays even the smallest attempt at their mother language. The more “happy” the crowd seems, actually, the worse his performance. If Zuck’s Mandarin was really good, the crowd would have been silent and wide-eyed.  · · · →

continue reading
Standard