Symphony

Cadence of Conflict: Asia, July 16, 2018

Global trade has become too congested and inbred. Enemies make vital weapons parts for each other—well, enemies of the US make vital weapons parts for the US, but don't return the favor. Western companies outsourced to developing markets, then were surprised at workplace hazards, loss in consumer trust, and didn't seem to anticipate that by sending jobs overseas they were downsizing their own customers.

The borderless fling wasn't going to last for a myriad of reasons—cultural incohesion being an impossibility for a manufacturing industry in denial, security conflicts of interest being a concern for Western powers. Internationalization is about governments and cultures understanding each other, not forcing cooperation between peoples who haven't yet learned to gel in the daily routines. Companies like Boeing got themselves too entangled in the scene of borderless manufacturing and are now whining and moaning because the inevitable finally happened. This indicates that their "globalist" action plan wasn't based in foresight, but delusional hopes.

Globalism is inevitable, but it won't take the path that the impatient hopefuls dreamed and thereby planned it would. Globalism needs cultural exchange to precede and exceed industrial integration, not vice versa. Boeing through the cart pulled its horse, banked on it, it backfired, and Boeing is now denying blame.

China and Europe, mainly Germany, are headed for the same blend of oil and water. This so-called "trade war" isn't setting well in China's market. Chinese people blame their government. That government doesn't want any misreporting that could even remotely influence the people into thinking that the unrelated trade and stock market could have any kind of direct relationship. The trouble Trump is making for China isn't demonstrated from rumors of censorship within China or its stock market, but in China's attempt for yet another foreseeably incohesive relationship with Germany. China is being smart, Germany is not.

China is owed everything by the West, but Germany hasn't figured this out yet. China doesn't need to say so because no one tells the obvious. A relationship between China and Germany would rightly favor China, Beijing would have no objection, but Berlin will cry and whine just as much as Boeing, once it all lays flat on the table. And, China will have made the profit.

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Symphony

Encore of Revival: America, July 16, 2018

Trump is on tour, not without protesters who only know the version of America shown to them through less popular news outlets which, accordingly, need overseas audiences. Usually, good, working people stay home and at work, then vote in elections to change the landscape, while unpopular protesters demonstrate where it only makes non-binding noise. Still, it is good for all Britons to have their opportunity to voice their concerns, even to the leader of another nation.

Protesting and demonstrating are never bad. Once one tries to silence the opposition, such as the SJW movement in America has, tyranny's way is paved for those same silencers to be silenced on the pendulum's return.

Trump is neither kowtowing nor blaming in Europe, he is stating conflicts of interest. Take for example Germany's former president leading a company that will profit from Russia selling gas to Germany, while the US pays the bill to defend Germany from Russia. Something is terribly wrong there. Trump's repeat word for that seated pre-dinner speech was the word "inappropriate".

The Helsinki summit between Putin and Trump is overdue. Reagan made peace with his adversaries. Even Gorbachev took a long moment to pause the line while he reflected at the late president's visitation.

Diplomats behind desks in carpeted offices see negotiations as a way to greedily push for what they want, without concern for the other guy. As a business owner and negotiator, Trump understands that other countries want to help their economies grow and thrive. That will make a world of difference, likely to the world.

At home, the police in America only shoot and kill without a trial when it's the "bad guys". But, they seem to be exempt from US military rules of engagement: Do not fire until fired upon. The Chicago police video shows an officer with pistol in hand while revealing a pistol still in the suspect's belt. This is a difficult situation to judge.

Police want to keep people safe. Carrying a gun without proper training is dangerous, but the government doesn't offer the Constitutionally required militia training for all citizens. The Second Amendment gives that man a right to carry that gun just as he did, regardless of Chicago's unconstitutional laws. But, too many Blacks in America vote against the Constitution. Police should be softer in their approach, while their concerns about safety and desire to apprehend "bad guys" are still understandable.

It looks like SCOTUS's nominee Brett Kavanaugh will be approved by the Senate just as likely as any other. If by slim chance he isn't approved, the next nominee won't be any easier to pass through the Senate. Whatever seat is up in the next round of a SCOTUS appointee will likely be more Conservative than Kavanaugh. But, the courts can sort out all of our problems. America really needs the same kind of sit-down that Putin is getting with Trump in Helsinki.

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Columns

Visit People

Take time out of your business to travel, sit, and talk face to face with people. Cancel important things. Cut your business profits. Ax. Hack. Chop off something you are doing that needs to be done. Make the sacrifice that won't kill you so that other people can encounter you in the flesh.

Sometimes it is rejuvenating and your own work list actually gets more items checked-off after a personal encounter. You need that encounter as much as other people do.

Some face-to-face time helps relationships because it's the right thing to do, costing everyone less time in the end.

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Columns

Pride or Principle

Most matters gridlocked by personal pride are cloaked as matters of "principle". They're not.

It seems like a matter of principle when you're mad as an angry bull and can only see the color red. "I can't let him get away with doing that to me," the attitude goes. "It's about the principle!"

Principles are important. Without them society breaks down entirely. So, look at the deeper principles truly at stake—much ado about little, mountains grown from ant hills, grown adults squabbling over matters so silly, children can't notice the difference. Being petty is also a matter of principle.

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Symphony

Cadence of Conflict: Asia, July 9, 2018

China is reaching out to the world. It doesn't want tariffs imposed by the US. President Xi Jinping likely feels betrayed by the man who was so kind to him previously, President of the United States Donald Trump. The Western press will of course paint China and Trump as the villains—each in their different sectors—while painting the consumer as the victim.

China's role is actually one of confusion. $500B one way and $100B another is fair if China is on the favorable end, of course. Why would someone be so cruel, using that as an excuse?

So, China is making its appeal to international bodies, such as the WTO. But, therein will befall another misunderstanding. The International community agrees on twelve nautical miles of ocean ownership, no more, and building islands doesn't count. China disagrees. So, appealing to International law won't work in China's favor, which will also seem unfair to the Chinese.

The Western press will make China out to be the bad guy, the aggressor. At the same time, the Western press will make Trump another bad guy for imposing tariffs. Of course China doesn't want tariffs, that much is understandable. But, coming to "China's" defense (actually their own) are the globalist businesses who believe that nationality, borders, and citizenship are a farce—that companies are the actual "nations" of the world. They are at war against both the US and China for not merging into one corporation. This is actually a battle for nationhood itself; from that perspective, both the US and China's responses make perfect sense.

As for China being the "bully" as portrayed by the Western press, China really doesn't see itself that way. The Chinese have no clue why the West would do such a thing, they really don't understand.

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Symphony

Encore of Revival: America, July 9, 2018

Facebook has been censoring many good things. Their procedures or automatic algorithms or whatever mechanism was designed to snag speech that just so happened to be from the Declaration of Independence was no isolated incident. Especially when a long train of abuses and usurpations evince a design, it's not coincidence, it's telling.

Facebook has had its hand caught in the cookie jar many times as of late. The social media giant doesn't seem interested in cultivating good will, but keeps working for excuses to drive away people who want to freely submit facts to a candid world via any platform but their own. Putting the post from The Vindicator newspaper back up won't prove to be enough. With trends and polls being what they are, the only way to prevent Facebook from taking a nosedive is for Zuckerberg to apologize for not endorsing Trump and write bots to flag posts praising Obama. That won't be fair, but it would be the only way to court favor lost among  the bulk of its home-market customers who are subtly shopping elsewhere.

But, the biggest wire tripped by Facebook censoring the Declaration of Independence wasn't the people's irritation with Facebook, but the resulting alertness about the Declaration of Independence. Facebook unwittingly helped make that document famous again. It seemed that America had forgotten all about it. Now, everyone is going to search and read what words created the safest nation in the world to hold such hot debates as the last two years, without fear of execution. For reclaiming attention to American history, Facebook has earned the first annual Pacific Daily Times Liberty of the Year award.

Thank you, Facebook, for reminding us of our heritage of freedom well fought for.

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Columns

Call Crazy Crazy

Don't be numb to crazy. People who drive people crazy are probably crazy people. Review the personality disorders and a handful of the top complexes.

"Mental health" means living a productive life, maintaining happy friendships, ability to adapt, and being able to deal with adversity—not melting down or throwing a tantrum because of an opponent. One of the sure signs that someone needs professional intervention is an inability to take responsibility and be a Good Samaritan when circumstance obviously dictates.

Anyone can learn about mental health. When you see crazy, don't fret and snowball your angry, recommend professional help.

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Symphony

Cadence of Conflict: Asia, July 2, 2018

https://www.dailymotion.com/video/x6ned0x

NBC reported news of recent months to counter news of recent weeks. It wouldn't be the first time NBC had a precarious definition of "news". Intelligence reports about very specific details of possible uranium production were broken as "news" by NBC. Bloomberg and others reported that NBC reported it. Taipei Times reported that Bloomberg reported that NBC reported it. NBC breaking this "older" news made more news than the outdated "news" itself. The whole claim smells smelly. It's likely a ruse, but we'll need about two weeks to know with confidence.

Hong Kongers like to protest so often that they are expected to protest annually. This year, protesters claimed a 50k head turnout; Hong Kong police estimated less than 10k, which would be a record low. Surely neither crowd estimate had any bias or motive to distort the numbers.

Remember, Hong Kong students like to protest more than is deserved. China could do better with counter-PR, but not much can be done when dealing with spoiled students. Don't be roused into hating China by the dwindling spoiled Hong Kongers. Protests are profitable in Hong Kong because they help sell newspapers in a market saturated with so many newspapers that they throw them at pedestrians on the sidewalks. Hong Kong's biggest problem is complacent Christians.

A more genuine problem of concern is the attention Chinese manufacturers are drawing from Western press coverage of Taiwan court rulings. Taiwan makes about 60% of the world's computer components. China wants in on the game and people are being prosecuted in Taiwan for stealing company secrets that would go to China. The biggest element of a case is in place: motive.

Most of the so-called "news" about trade wars are the most obvious. Companies are having problems with trade during a trade war. Really? This is considered news these days. Either that, or it is an obvious attempt to skirt the deeper issues behind the China-US trade war for global economy hopefuls hoping to sway public sentiment by reporting what was all foreseeable.

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Symphony

Encore of Revival: America, July 2, 2018

https://www.dailymotion.com/video/x6necue

America is in great peril. A party is looking at winning the midterm right after winning the presidency. This is not normal and it doesn't matter how "wonderful" the party may seem at the time. Single-party rule is the death of the nation.

Mass shootings, Leftist protests, anger, rage, blame—the Left turns up the volume and the Republican party grows bigger.

The Republican Party is not what anyone thinks it is because the Republican Party isn't really a thing. This is the party that despised its own president, who is giving them this unusual midterm victory—but then suddenly gets behind him. This is not a party with normal values of conscience, but a party that gauges popular opinion and always arrives at the right conclusion too late—because that party actually has a moral compass quite different from the rest of the country.

Whatever that hidden moral compass is will only be seen after the party gains its supermajority and Trump leaves. From the moment he announced, Trump's biggest danger was always that he would succeed too well.

Give it ten years to ripen, but we live in the most dangerous time of the nation's history. Of course, there's always a chance to wake up and get it done right. But, the nation first needs to see the danger where it lies: in the hidden values of the always "failing" GOP, then to recognize that hope has already been kindled.

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Symphony

Cadence of Conflict: Asia, Jun 25, 2018

China is facing money problems, as the Western press continues to document in detail. China's economy is largely based on real estate. China's unusual form of communism includes laws that govern economics—especially with real estate, of course—and these laws are unusual in much of the rest of the world. As a result, people in China need to borrow money for things they normally wouldn't borrow money for. The repayment schedules are also strange.

The only way that a real estate business can stay afloat is if the prices of real estate keep rising. The more it rises, the more it needs to rise. Money doesn't fall from trees, but in China it needs to keep falling from somewhere in order to keep this vicious cycle spinning faster and faster. Eventually, the speed of the spinning wheel will exceed the strength of the wheel and it will all fly apart.

Then, we have China's strategy in the South Sea—also involving real estate. The man-made islands are complete. It all happened while the West watched closely and did nothing to stop it. They are heavily fortified and militarized.

Trump reminds the world that we aren't out of the woods yet with North Korea, Democrats misinterpret that as a contradiction—as if one step of progress means it's all over. Japan is ending its drills. The Korean problem is simmering down and Taiwan is escalating.

Now, we have the US strengthening its ties with Taiwan, the linchpin of the Pacific. Diplomats are visiting. Congressmen are calling for Taiwan's membership in sovereign-state-only organizations such as the UN. And, the Taiwan "Independence Party" welcomes US military cooperation.

Why would the US make such a bold move to side with Taiwan? Consider the US president's financial background: real estate. Trump understand's the economic crisis brewing in China. No one has said so, but the pieces line up. The US is positioning Taiwan as the main frontal push against China while the "attack from behind", as it were, is economics.

China is beefing up cyber attacks on Taiwan. US aircraft flying near the man-made islands are being hit by blinding flashes of light from the ground and from "fishing" boats, disrupting aviation. Using lasers such ways is illegal in war as both the US and China have signed agreements to.

China is also using drones that look like flying birds, but China wasn't the first. This technology has been used before. Interestingly, China has maintained a policy that tech manufactured in China must be shared with China's government. It would be even more interesting to see if any research surfaces on how many patent royalties China might owe for tech used to surveil its own people—surveillance only enabled by tech giants who caved into China's demands. But, due to the Tump administration, all that's coming to a grinding halt. If China wants better tech to spy on its own people, it's going to need to develop that tech on its own.

Those man-made islands in the South Sea were allowed to be built for a reason. Could they have been intended all along to become "booty" that will be "owned" by the West as Hong Kong was after the Opium Wars? Hong Kong just might be included if China is forced into concessions, especially with all the "ra-ra" fuss among spoiled Hong Kong students. The US strategy indicates many lofty "hopefuls" in the queue, should the status quo shift—in what direction no one knows. It seems that the Trump administration has aims much higher than merely settling disputes in Korea.

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Symphony

Encore of Revival: America, Jun 25, 2018

The world is shifting all over, not only in America. But, Americans are seeing the shift at home. It doesn't make headlines, but then again it is "trending", which makes headlines: Facebook is in peril. Zuckerberg overreached. While user privacy is one important topic, so is politically biased censorship.

It's legal to express one's political ideals, but it's also illegal for Leftist-controlled companies to ban opposition views, citing "community" standards and guidelines as the excuse for censored speech. China does it and it's wrong in the Western mind, but what if Facebook and Twitter do it? Well, that's a different story, somehow.

Facebook and Twitter are publicly traded companies, thus regulated by the FTC. An argument could be made for publicly companies to be heavily fined—and the directors, executives, and operators fired—for censoring speech. But, this opens another debate. What about "hateful" religions that cultivate the hate without actually crossing the line of "dangerous" hate speech?

The "giantness" of social media is a backlash against the "giant" media oldschool. But, social media giants are creating a backlash of their own. FTC-regulated free speech isn't the solution to the implosion of social media giants. Instead, Facebook is doing a favor to its contenders. By being unfriendly, they are naturally encouraging their "customers" to shop elsewhere. This will have a far-reaching cascade effect and could make a swarm of new billionaires that eclipse Mark Zuckerberg, Elon Musk, and Jeff Bezos.

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Columns

Why It’s All Predictable

Almost everything is predictable and for good reason. Some things don't change. If you understand those things, fewer things will catch you off guard. Those things that don't change are timeless principles.

Usually, it is an indication of antisocial tendency when someone can't anticipate what consequences will follow certain choices and actions. If someone can't tell where their choices will lead, they may not understand timeless principles either. In this sense, everyone suffers from antisocial tendencies on some level.

Learn wisdom, moral principles, timeless truths, and others' pasts. The more you understand history, the less the future will surprise you.

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Letters

Sent

We Are Sent.

There’s a big difference between us going out on our own and spreading the Good News of the Kingdom because we like it, and being sent on assignment to to do the very same work.

We’re sent. We're on assignment. Commissioned by Heaven.

Jesus sent us: “As the Father has sent me, I am sending you.” [John 20:21]

Think about that first word, “As” for a minute: This is like what Father has done.

You and I are sent under the same terms and conditions that applied when Father sent Jesus to Earth.

Let that mess with your head for a minute. Jesus was sent as the embodiment of Heaven to extend the Kingdom (“kingship”) of heaven on Earth. Every time Jesus confronted darkness, the Kingdom of Heaven emerged victorious. Every time Jesus met someone sick, he healed them.

OK. That stretches me a fair bit. I’m not just a follower, just a “believer”, just a pew-warmer, just “little ol’ me.” I’m sent to Earth with the same assignment, with the same backing, with the same power that Jesus was sent with.

“As the Father has sent me, I am sending you.” Whoa.

Now for the second half:

“Jesus knew that the Father had put all things under his power, and that he had come from God and was returning to God….” [John 13:3]

How was Jesus sent from the Father? With all things under his power, knowing he had come from God, knowing he was returning to God.

“As the Father has sent me, I am sending you.” What does this say about how you’re sent?

And of course, the very next thing Jesus did was to wash the boys’ feet. Isn’t that how we’re sent?

We're sent to wash feet in the power of, and as a representative of, the King of Kings. He's washing feet through you and me.










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